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Unicheck Blog on Plagiarism

Developing Writing Skills: Eliminating THAT. Part 1

Developing Writing Skills: Eliminating THAT. Part 1

If you’ve been following my articles on this blog, then you know I’ve written about two important principles of good writing – the art of brevity and the art of clarity. I’ve also said the two go hand-in-hand, but sometimes the relationship between them can be antagonistic. Your overall approach in writing should be to find the right mix of these two foundational principles.

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5 Publishing Tips for Young Writers

5 Publishing Tips for Young Writers

Writing is one thing, but getting published is another thing altogether. First of all, don’t believe anyone who says you’re “too young” to become a published writer. There are publications out there that will publish the work of writers as young as age five! So when someone tells you you’re too young, just smile and say you’re sorry they feel that way and then get back to your writing! What are your options as a young writer to get published? This article will give you some good starting points.

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The Art of Clarity: 8 KIS Principles for Clearer Professional Writing

The Art of Clarity: 8 KIS Principles for Clearer Professional Writing

One of the biggest challenges all writers face is the daunting task of learning to write clearly.

Without clarity, it doesn’t matter what your ultimate purpose is for writing because readers will be unable to figure out what you’re trying to say. You want people to understand your ideas rather than spend their time trying to understand your sentences. The need for clarity applies no matter what you’re writing, whether it’s an email, a blog post, a newspaper article, or an academic paper.

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The Art of Brevity: How to Improve Writing When Adverbs Get in the Way

The Art of Brevity: How to Improve Writing When Adverbs Get in the Way

William Strunk Jr. was a professor of English at Cornell University who published The Elements of Style in 1918. One of his former students, E. B. White (author of such children’s classics as Charlotte’s Web and Stuart Little), revised and expanded the original, which became a leading style manual for writers commonly referred to as Strunk & White. He had this to say about brevity:

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