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Unicheck Blog on Plagiarism

gamification in the classroom

How to Effectively Use Gamification in the Classroom

Five years ago, “gamification” was the hottest buzzword in marketing and e-commerce. Retailers were encouraged to incorporate game-like structures, such as consumer competition, scoreboards, and prizes into their product strategy to manifest an increase in conversion rate and a spike in return rates and customer loyalty. Gaming was a “new” way to attract customers to shop again and again by utilizing components most of us grew up with playing board games (or on the original game consoles like Atari and Nintendo). Online start-ups like ModCloth.com used gamification strategy to launch features like Be the Buyer where customers can vote and comment on clothing samples in order to put them into production, a unique concept relying on gaming elements that helped grow ModCloth’s business to $100 million a year.

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Cloud Based Technologies and the Changing Face of Education

Cloud Based Technologies and the Changing Face of Education

How long ago do you think the idea of a traditional classroom conjured up images of the one-room schoolhouse on the prairie? Or the struggling classroom was the overcrowded inner-city concrete room where broken down old textbooks were shared and student engagement was more like mayhem? Or the innovative classroom where siblings gathered around a radio broadcast coming to the remote Australian outback and assignments were delivered by airplane?  

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The Fine Line Between Plagiarism and Research

The Fine Line Between Plagiarism and Research

There are hundreds of quotes signifying the difference between plagiarism and research. The gist of everyone’s thoughts on the matter boils down to this – it’s plagiarism if you use one source for your point of view within your academic paper, but it is considered research if you use more than one source to cover the topic. Of course, there are times when that train of thought might not hold up when writing academic papers.

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9 Ways to Use Twitter in the Classroom

9 Ways to Use Twitter in the Classroom

It’s hard to believe that only two decades ago we didn’t use the Internet for our educational needs as often as we do now. It was hardly possible to find an educator with a classroom blog, but now it’s a common practice. Step by step, teachers got used to the idea that both teaching and learning become more productive and enjoyable when web resources are used. Going digital has implicit advantages.

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Plagiarism and the Internet: How Technology Affects Cheating

Plagiarism and the Internet: How Technology Affects Cheating

The Internet is commonly blamed for encouraging cheating among students. They say the Internet suggests a number of opportunities to cheat, making it much simpler. If you sincerely believe that cheating is the 21st century disease, you will change your tune after reading the last sentence of the article. But before, let’s have a closer look at the most widespread online cheating methods:

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Teaching Millennials: Engaging a New Generation of Students

Teaching Millennials: Engaging a New Generation of Students

You have heard of the Millennial Generation, or perhaps you are more familiar with the many other labels attached to this generation of children born between 1981 and 1999. Sometimes referred to as Digital Natives, Generation Y, Generation Me, the Baby Boom Echo Generation, Nexters, they are all the youngsters who are making up the bulk of our classrooms, and our colleges.

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